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SBMI official: ‘No need to refloat Solar 1’

September 16, 2006

By JUM BALEA
abs-cbnNEWS.com

THE vice-chairman of the Coast Guard’s Special Board of Marine Inquiry (SBMI) said Saturday it would be best to leave the sunken M/T Solar 1 settled on Guimaras seabed if the oil inside the tanker would freeze due to the very low temperature.

“Sa baba ng temperatura doon sa ilalim baka nga tumigas na sa loob ng tanke yung mga langis na ‘yon (It’s possible that because of the low temperature at the sea bottom, the oil trapped inside the sunken tanker froze),” Commodore Benjamin Mata said at the weekly Kapihan sa Sulo news forum.

Mata based his statement on a report submitted by Japanese salvage experts that Solar 1 settled under 11 degrees centigrade water temperature.

He said that just like ordinary cooking oil, which freezes when placed inside a refrigerator, the oil inside the tanker would also solidify at a low temperature and cease from leaking.

Should the theory hold true, Mata said there would be no need to refloat the tanker or siphon the oil.

(For the full story, click No need, Sept. 16, 2006.)

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PSEUDO-SCIENTIST shoots off his mouth on something he has absolutely no expertise on. Duh.

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One comment

  1. Number 6 fuel oil is a thick, syrupy, black, tar-like liquid, used for commercial and industrial heating, electricity generation and to power ships. It smells like tar, and may even become semi-solid in cooler temperatures. No. 6 fuel oil, also known as bunk oil, bunker oil, or black liquor, is a petroleum product consisting of a complicated mix of hydrocarbons with high boiling points. It is a “leftover”, or residual product of crude oil after the more valuable hydrocarbons have been removed.

    But bunker oil is also simply the common word used in marine industry to name the fuel or diesel or gasoil burnt in ships’ tanks. There are many types. Which one was loaded on Solar 1?



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